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SG1_Lud 03-27-2012 03:35 AM

Thank you for the gift Richie.

BP_Tailspin 03-27-2012 03:52 AM

Thanks for posting.

Herbs107 03-27-2012 04:18 AM

Fantastic images thanks for posting them Richie.

335th_GRAthos 03-27-2012 04:10 PM

Vulcan
 
For those interested....



Falklands' Most Daring Raid in Channel4

http://www.channel4.com/programmes/f...st-daring-raid

On 30 April 1982, the RAF launched a secret mission: to fly a Vulcan bomber to
the Falkland Islands and bomb Port Stanley's runway, putting it out of action
for Argentine fighter jets. The safety of the British Task Force depended on
its success.

However, the RAF could only get a single crumbling, Cold War-era Vulcan 8000
miles south to the Falklands, because one bomber needed an aerial fleet of 13
Victor tanker planes to refuel it throughout the 16-hour round-trip. At the
time it was the longest-range bombing mission in history.

From start to finish, the seemingly impossible mission was a comedy of errors,
held together by pluck and ingenuity.

On the brink of being scrapped, only three of the ageing nuclear bombers could
be fitted out for war, one to fly the mission and two in reserve. Crucial spare
parts were scavenged from museums and scrap yards: one vital component had been
serving as an ashtray in the Officers' Mess.

In just three weeks, the Vulcan crews had to learn air-to-air refuelling, which
they hadn't done for 20 years, and conventional bombing, which they hadn't done
for ten.

The RAF scoured the country for Second World War iron bombs, and complex
refuelling calculations were done the night before on a £5 pocket calculator.

With a plan stretched to the limit and the RAF's hopes riding on just one
Vulcan, the mission was flown on a knife-edge; fraught with mechanical
failures, unreliable navigation, electrical storms and not enough fuel.

Of the 21 bombs the Vulcan dropped, only one found its target. But it was
enough to change the outcome of the war.

Astonishingly, this great feat has been downplayed into near obscurity by
history, but this documentary brings it back to life, providing a thrilling and
uncharacteristically upbeat account from the Falklands War: the Dambusters for
the 1980s generation.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

~S~

PeterPanPan 03-27-2012 05:12 PM

Was first aired last week. EXCELLENT program - incredible story.
PPP

arthursmedley 03-27-2012 05:37 PM

"Of the 21 bombs the Vulcan dropped, only one found its target. But it was
enough to change the outcome of the war."

Absolute TV history bullsh#t!

PeterPanPan 03-27-2012 05:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by arthursmedley (Post 403403)
"Of the 21 bombs the Vulcan dropped, only one found its target. But it was
enough to change the outcome of the war."

Absolute TV history bullsh#t!

Agreed re that bit ;). Why do they feel the need to write that stuff?! Never-the-less an amazing story, very well told IMHO.

No1 Cheese 03-27-2012 06:35 PM

Gents i think the post was trying to say it was a great mission? and if you agree or not on the war it was a great mission.

Cheese

PeterPanPan 03-27-2012 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by No1 Cheese (Post 403420)
Gents i think the post was trying to say it was a great mission? and if you agree or not on the war it was a great mission.

Cheese

Totally agree - sorry if my post was vague! I thought it was an incredible mission in every respect. The book, Vulcan 607, tells the whole story in detail and is superbly written - gripping stuff!

Richie 03-27-2012 11:18 PM

I was just thinking about Robert Redford telling a story about when he was a young man walking down a long stretch of highway and being able to hear a car coming from a mile away. That is real "One The Road" moment. You'll probably never find that now a days.

JG52Uther 03-30-2012 06:06 PM

Do17 underwater survey for the RAF museum
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DlBKYXHSuhc

Al Schlageter 03-31-2012 04:41 PM

Photos, photos and more photos
 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/8270787...69786717/show/

all in color

fruitbat 03-31-2012 04:51 PM

Cool, thanks for posting:cool:

BP_Tailspin 03-31-2012 05:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fruitbat (Post 404576)
Cool, thanks for posting:cool:

I agree with this statement http://www.cubpilot.com/Tspin/Woot.gif

KG26_Alpha 03-31-2012 06:49 PM

Unbelievable collection thanks for the link.

Shame there's no background story to cover the pics.

addman 03-31-2012 08:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KG26_Alpha (Post 404590)
Unbelievable collection thanks for the link.

Shame there's no background story to cover the pics.

Try clicking on "Show Info" in the upper right corner, awesome stuff this site thanks!

KG26_Alpha 03-31-2012 10:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by addman (Post 404601)
Try clicking on "Show Info" in the upper right corner, awesome stuff this site thanks!

Bingo.......... works great on Firefox

MB_Avro_UK 04-02-2012 01:17 PM

Thanks for posting.

And shot down by a Defiant?

Sternjaeger II 04-02-2012 02:51 PM

it's gonna be a helluva restoration job if they manage to recover it in one piece.
The Do-17 wing surface is HUGE, so recovering it in one bit will be quite a challenge, especially considering how thin the tail section is. Even if they manage to recover it though, there will be a massive and extensive restoration job needed to bring it back to its original shine, and there might be a case where they will have to decide whether to leave it as it is (once they stop corrosion) or give it back its original shine.

Osprey 04-02-2012 03:02 PM

I hope they bring her up to the surface for a restoration. I remember reading that the wreck was known about for some time and some people have pinched the guns from it - the RAF say it's MoD property and want them back.

Sternjaeger II 04-03-2012 11:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Osprey (Post 405151)
I hope they bring her up to the surface for a restoration. I remember reading that the wreck was known about for some time and some people have pinched the guns from it - the RAF say it's MoD property and want them back.

I can't imagine them being in any nick good enough to be used, so it's not a security threat, but these kinda folks really grind my gears!

As for the claims of the MoD, LOL! Come on chaps, you find a unique relic in shallow waters and not expect somebody reckless enough not to have a go at it?

Anyway why is it considered MoD property? I don't know much of the UK legislation on the matter.

Adlerhorst 04-04-2012 09:24 PM

Battle of Britain today
 
I am coming to London on business at the end of May and have about 2 1/2 days available to immerse myself in some BOB History. What are the must-sees in your opinion>? Thanks:cool:

furbs 04-04-2012 09:32 PM

Bit of a trip out of London but IWM Duxford is well worth it...

http://www.iwm.org.uk/visits/iwm-duxford

Ze-Jamz 04-04-2012 09:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by furbs (Post 405897)
Bit of a trip out of London but IWM Duxford is well worth it...

http://www.iwm.org.uk/visits/iwm-duxford

+1

And Duxford if you dont mind a small bit of travel

mungee 04-04-2012 09:53 PM

Without doubt, the Battle of Britain Museum at Hawkinge - it's a hidden gem!!
One needs to travel by train to Canterbury & then by bus to Hawkinge - the museum is a relatively short walk from the bus stop in Hawkinge. The museum has a website.

fruitbat 04-04-2012 10:06 PM

if you do make your way to Hawkinge then i suggest you go to Manston as well, great little free museum,

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y29...9082010056.jpg

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y29...9082010043.jpg

Depending on my work schedule i could meet up and show you around some of the BoB stuff in S.E Kent, i live 2 miles from Manston.

major_setback 04-04-2012 11:40 PM

RAF museum Hendon. A very good museum, I think it's as good as Duxford...and you won't have to travel out of London.
Look at the list of aircraft on display (including a Sunderland and Lancaster):

http://www.aviationmuseum.eu/World/E...rce_Museum.htm

I'm certain there is a Wellington too, but it's not on the list.

The Battle of Britain exhibition hall is excellent.

ATAG_Dutch 04-05-2012 12:35 AM

If you get the chance to hop on a train to Folkestone/Dover, the BoB memorial at Capel-le Ferne, situated on top of the White cliffs;

http://www.battleofbritainmemorial.org/the-memorial/

Also, not everyone's cup of tea, but the RAF's Church of St. Clement Danes in central London.

pupaxx 04-05-2012 11:49 AM

Hendon RAF Museum
Imperial War Museum London
HMS Belfast...sorry seems HMS Belfast is currently closed and will not be reopening until after Easter 2012. But u can take nice pictures cause it is anchored near London Tower Bridge
Churchill War Room
if u have enough time to go near Cambridge u can visit IWM Duxford and the Shuttleworth Collection at the Old Warden airfield (WWI)
This is my favorite tour in England ;)

jcenzano 04-05-2012 11:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by major_setback (Post 405926)
RAF museum Hendon. A very good museum, I think it's as good as Duxford...and you won't have to travel out of London.
Look at the list of aircraft on display (including a Sunderland and Lancaster):

http://www.aviationmuseum.eu/World/E...rce_Museum.htm

I'm certain there is a Wellington too, but it's not on the list.

The Battle of Britain exhibition hall is excellent.

+1

I don´t know the other ones in the UK (i know several across the US, Germany and Spain) but I must tell you that Hendon is indeed an excellent museum.

Worth to be included in your agenda.

Peaveywolf 04-05-2012 12:10 PM

The War Museum is a good visit, and not that far from central london, just on the south side of the Thames.

phoenix1963 04-05-2012 08:23 PM

SO w1nd6urfa, what did you see?

phoenix1963

MB_Avro_UK 04-05-2012 08:51 PM

Try and go to Old Warden near Biggleswade.

It's an old aerodrome with a grass runway. Anywhere that has Biggles in the name has my vote.

http://www.shuttleworth.org/gallery.asp

Better still, buy myself and my lady a firkin of beer and we'll take you there ourselves:cool:


Best Regards,
MB_Avro.

gelbevierzehn 04-05-2012 09:56 PM

Duxford... definitely Duxford... :D

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7215/7...07a8a0a6_b.jpg

mazex 04-05-2012 10:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by w1nd6urfa (Post 397553)
Hello all,

I will be visiting Malta next week, does anyone know of any WW2 related exhibits / museums worth paying a visit?

TIA
w1nd

I was there on a conference a few years ago and If you have a diving license I can recommend an exhibition that is 15 meters below the surface right in the outer part of the Grand Harbor of Valetta ;) HMS Maori, a tribal class destroyer that was sunk by Stukas in 1942...

Very easy dive and very accessible from the shore of the harbor...

EDIT: Oups - old thread but I stand by my advice for other people visiting Malta ;) And there is a Blenheim and a Beaufighter amongst other aircraft out in the ocean... Rather deep though in most cases...

klem 04-05-2012 11:06 PM

Best aviation museums:-

Duxford near Cambridge, may even be flying displays, check their program
http://www.iwm.org.uk/visits/iwm-duxford

Hendon is nearer to London
http://www.aviationmuseum.eu/World/E...rce_Museum.htm

If you are near the South Coast, Tangmere Aviation Museum near Chichester is fairly small but a gem. I'll put you in our Lightning Simulator :)
http://www.tangmere-museum.org.uk/

w1nd6urfa 04-06-2012 04:01 AM

5 Attachment(s)
The Aviation Museum is great! they have restored a Spit IX and a Hurri recovered from the sea:

.

w1nd6urfa 04-06-2012 04:07 AM

1 Attachment(s)
There's the remains of a Swordfish awaiting restoration:

.

w1nd6urfa 04-06-2012 04:13 AM

2 Attachment(s)
A Tiger Moth which apparently is airworthy:

.

w1nd6urfa 04-06-2012 04:17 AM

2 Attachment(s)
And the grandad of IL-2 ;)

.

airmalik 04-06-2012 11:09 PM

Bomber Boys available online
 
Watched Bomber Boys on the TV last night. Pretty good show with great footage of one of the only two flying Lancasters in the air.

You can watch it online here:

http://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/video...77/Bomber-Boys

It's only available online for 14 more days.

enjoy!

Synopsis: Ewan McGregor and his aviator brother Colin tell the story of the RAF's Bomber Command and the men who fought and died in the skies above Europe during World War Two. Ewan and Colin meet a number of key surviving members of Bomber Command and take on a variety of practical challenges. While Colin fulfils his lifetime ambition of flying one of the only two surviving Lancaster Bombers, Ewan learns what it was like being a tail-gunner - perhaps the most lonely and dangerous job of all bomber aircrew.

Troll2k 04-06-2012 11:20 PM

"This content is currently unavailable".

Maybe it because I am out of the Australian zone.

airmalik 04-06-2012 11:25 PM

Yeah I'm sorry didn't check if it was available outside AU.

Can I watch On Demand outside Australia?
Rights agreements mean that SBS On Demand is only available in the Australia. Even if you are an Australian citizen you cannot access the service from abroad. Some videos of Insight, Dateline and World News Australia clips are available to watch internationally.

banned 04-07-2012 01:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by airmalik (Post 406543)
Watched Bomber Boys on the TV last night. Pretty good show with great footage of one of the only two flying Lancasters in the air.

You can watch it online here:

http://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/video...77/Bomber-Boys

It's only available online for 14 more days.

enjoy!

Synopsis: Ewan McGregor and his aviator brother Colin tell the story of the RAF's Bomber Command and the men who fought and died in the skies above Europe during World War Two. Ewan and Colin meet a number of key surviving members of Bomber Command and take on a variety of practical challenges. While Colin fulfils his lifetime ambition of flying one of the only two surviving Lancaster Bombers, Ewan learns what it was like being a tail-gunner - perhaps the most lonely and dangerous job of all bomber aircrew.

That was friggin excellent mate. A great show. Thanks for supplying the link.

WeReLex 04-13-2012 11:27 PM

"Friend - Foe" The Soviet documentary film
 
Hi people. A very good man made subs and uploaded on YouTube.
This documentary film of 1991 about people in aviation made in USSR just before its dissolution. The quality is not very good, but you can find only VHS rip... it's a very rare movie.
Planes Su-27 and MiG-29. The film is dedicated to Ivan Kozhedub.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfarD...ature=youtu.be

The theme of the forum sukhoi.ru: http://www.sukhoi.ru/forum/showthrea...73#post1825573

335th_GRAthos 04-16-2012 12:06 PM

Castles of Steel: Britain, Germany, and the Winning of the Great War at Sea
 
For those interested in warships:

Castles of Steel: Britain, Germany, and the Winning of the Great War at Sea
by Robert K. Massie
(This is Massie's second book, the first being Dreadnought: Britain, Germany, and the coming of the Great War).

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...eel_Cover1.jpg


The book begins in the lead-up to the declaration of hostilities between Germany and Britain, whereas Massie's previous work ended with the beginning of the war. All the significant naval strategies and battles of World War I are covered, including the Battle of Coronel, where a German squadron led by Admiral Maximilian von Spee destroyed a weaker British cruiser squadron under the command of Admiral Sir Christopher Cradock; the ensuing Battle of the Falkland Islands where von Spee's force was annihilated by a superior British squadron; the Battle of Dogger Bank (1915); Naval operations in the Dardanelles Campaign; and a detailed multichapter narrative of the Battle of Jutland and its aftermath.

Other chapters describe German submarine warfare and events triggering America's entry into the war. There are also chapters dedicated to central personalities such as British Admirals John Jellicoe and David Beatty and the German Admirals Franz von Hipper and Reinhard Scheer. The book ends with an account of the scuttling of the German High Seas Fleet in Scapa Flow.



~S~

JG5_emil 04-16-2012 09:58 PM

I have this book it's brilliant :)

Ploughman 04-16-2012 10:38 PM

That I've not read this book yet is an omission of the highest order.

arthursmedley 04-16-2012 11:29 PM

This looks really interesting Grathos. There is a third book in this story but not by this author and unfortunately long out of print but a quick google search produced the first 46 pages in pdf. Check out the pics. A truly amazing story.

http://www.pr-productions.co.uk/The%20Man.pdf

335th_GRAthos 04-17-2012 07:36 AM

Nice story, never heard about it.

Thanks Arthur!

~S~

WTE_Galway 04-18-2012 12:30 AM

Of course from a 2012 perspective we would have been better off if the German fleet was still there sunk rather than salvaged and cut up for scrap.

Imagine all the archeological opportunities and BBC/Discovery-Channel documentaries it would have created.

335th_GRAthos 04-18-2012 09:05 AM

F18 breaking cable while landing on aircraft carrier
 
Impressive video, one (very lucky) guy jumping over the snapping cable, seven others less fortunate:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=1c0lfwxRpj0


~S~

Sternjaeger II 04-18-2012 09:54 AM

walking the deck of an aircraft carrier is still one of the most dangerous jobs on the market. I wonder how much these guys earn!

159th_Jester 04-18-2012 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sternjaeger II (Post 410687)
walking the deck of an aircraft carrier is still one of the most dangerous jobs on the market. I wonder how much these guys earn!

I think if you were to ask any of those guys who were hit by that cable, the answer would be "Not enough!"

;)

xpzorg 04-18-2012 10:30 AM

Few years ago on my construction site cable torn off leg of worker

Sternjaeger II 04-18-2012 11:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 159th_Jester (Post 410705)
I think if you were to ask any of those guys who were hit by that cable, the answer would be "Not enough!"

;)

I bet! ;)

Quote:

Originally Posted by xpzorg (Post 410706)
Few years ago on my construction site cable torn off leg of worker

yeah, that's the actual risk: the whiplash of such big steel cables can cut through metal, let alone a human body!

then you have the risk of being sucked in by a jet or minced by a propeller, roasted by jet exhausts, decapitated by wings, blown up or burned by weapons/fuel, thrown in the sea (with pretty much little to no chance of even being found), crushed by unsecured aircraft...

All in all they could probably do a "Final Destination Special" only on aircraft carrier ops! :shock:

taildraggernut 04-18-2012 11:25 AM

Heres a good example...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ugvYWyiUDw

this ones frightening...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BI9Sj...eature=related

Skoshi Tiger 04-18-2012 11:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by taildraggernut (Post 410726)

Just seeing how quickly the men on the deck react is a testiment to the quality of the men, their professionalism and training.

arthursmedley 04-18-2012 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WTE_Galway (Post 410574)
Of course from a 2012 perspective we would have been better off if the German fleet was still there sunk rather than salvaged and cut up for scrap.

Imagine all the archeological opportunities and BBC/Discovery-Channel documentaries it would have created.

Yeah, this sort of thing does make great TV. I would imagine a few TV production companies are in talks with our Burmese Spitfire hunters right now.
I seem to recall there is a demand for sunken battleship steel today. It was generally of very high quality and more importantly, being beneath the ocean since before August 1945 means it has not been irradiated by atmospheric nuclear weapons testing and is needed for sensitive medical testing instruments, space satellites designed to detect cosmic radiations, etc.

xpzorg 04-18-2012 12:48 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCdExWtHWrA
We don't need fire brigade, we can fly vertically:)


P.S. about cable the ripper http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8_8735oeQI
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sknyliv_air_show_disaster
(Many people have died from the cable which hooked to the plane)

159th_Jester 04-18-2012 12:57 PM

Which US carrier was it that had an incident with a missile release on the flight deck during the Vietnam war?

Can't remember the name of the ship but the documentary about the incident was chilling. An electrical short circuit released an A-A missile which set fire to another aircraft also preparing to take off on the other side of the flight deck and resulted in a good bit of ordinance cooking off.

Absolutely horrifying, but as Skoshi just said above, the crew's reaction was testimony to the quality of the men and their training.

SQB 04-18-2012 01:28 PM

Regarding your post xpzorg, thanking you for posting a video which cuts off at that point. I was there for that airshow and witnessed the crash, I tried to help injured and shocked off the airfield and it was my definition of hell on earth. Just seeing the aircraft again brings back those memories.

xpzorg 04-18-2012 01:44 PM

Sorry, i didn't want to seem cynical and callous. Of course i understand that is big tragedy and that's why i post it in reply in 3 first humorous posts.

BadAim 04-18-2012 03:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 159th_Jester (Post 410778)
Which US carrier was it that had an incident with a missile release on the flight deck during the Vietnam war?

Can't remember the name of the ship but the documentary about the incident was chilling. An electrical short circuit released an A-A missile which set fire to another aircraft also preparing to take off on the other side of the flight deck and resulted in a good bit of ordinance cooking off.

Absolutely horrifying, but as Skoshi just said above, the crew's reaction was testimony to the quality of the men and their training.

That was the Forestall. John McCain was sitting in the plane that was hit. In an odd twist of fate (after miraculously surviving) he later transferred to the Oriskany which had been the site of a fire that killed 44 men the year before. He was promptly shot down and spent the rest of the war as a POW.

Seems like aircraft carrier duty is not for the feint of heart.

5./JG27.Farber 04-18-2012 03:16 PM

Navy Flight Student Crash Video, at 1 min - are those his legs? :(


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XeRXre_FG1w

Sternjaeger II 04-18-2012 04:13 PM

jeeez, that tumbling bomb on the deck was scary :shock:

Pips 04-18-2012 05:54 PM

Massie's book is arguably one of the best on the subject of the naval arms race of the early 1900's, it's affect on diplomacy across Europe and it's ultimate contribution to sowing the seeds for war in 1914. It's more than just another book on the Battle off Jutland.

It's broad scope lays down the factors that contributed to the ill feeling that grew between Britain and Germany from the late 1890's onwards. The naval arms race between the two was much more than just a desire by Germany to seek parity with the Royal Navy, it was a direct threat to the status of Britain as the premier world power, it's trade affilations and influence.

A brilliant book.

Herbs107 04-19-2012 12:21 AM

Finally laid to rest.
 
THE family of Australian Spitfire pilot RAAF Sergeant William Smith will gather in France for a final farewell almost 70 years after he went missing over the English Channel.
Last seen engaged in a desperate dogfight with a large group of German fighters on May 9, 1942, 24-year-old Sgt Smith was listed as missing in action until October 2011.

Excavating what they believed was the wreckage of a downed Czech aircraft in Hardifort, northern France, a documentary film crew found the remains of Sgt Smith and his Spitfire.

Today, Sgt Smith, who was commended by his commanding officer for his "quiet, calm way of going about his duties" will be interred at a ceremony with full military honours at Cassel Cemetery in France.

Sgt Smith's surviving brother, Bert, is expected to travel from Australia to attend the ceremony and deliver a eulogy for his sibling, who was born at Kalgoorlie, Western Australia, and lived at Whittlesea in Victoria.


At the time of his disappearance, Sgt Smith was single and flying with an Australian squadron within the Royal Air Force. He enlisted in the RAAF in 1940, aged 22.

Thee_oddball 04-19-2012 12:55 AM

Some closure for his family, RIP

salmo 04-19-2012 02:17 AM

Sgt William Smith was stationed at Redhill in Surrey with 457 Squadron and on May 9, 1942, his Spitfire helped escort a number of Boston bombers in a raid over northern France. On their return to England the squadron was attacked by up to 30 Fock-Wulf Fw 190s midway between Mardyck and Dover. Sgt Smith, who was 24 at the time, was last sighted at 20,000ft in combat with a number of Fw 190s.

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/...78_634x430.jpg

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/...86_634x453.jpg
An identification tag and charms belonging to the brave pilot are pictured

R.I.P. Bill.

baronWastelan 04-19-2012 03:09 AM

The world can't thank Sgt. Smith and Australia enough for their sacrifice.

Sutts 04-19-2012 08:05 AM

P-40 Found In Sahara
 
Found by oil explorers, looks genuine to me. Would be very hard to fake that kind of detail.

Can any of our Polish friends talk to this guy please and see if they can find someone to recover it before it's trashed by scrappers? Would hate to see it go the same way as Lady Be Good.

Polish website but here's the translation:

http://translate.google.com/translat...ge%3D1&act=url

addman 04-19-2012 08:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sutts (Post 411087)
Found by oil explorers, looks genuine to me. Would be very hard to fake that kind of detail.

Can any of our Polish friends talk to this guy please and see if they can find someone to recover it before it's trashed by scrappers? Would hate to see it go the same way as Lady Be Good.

Polish website but here's the translation:

http://translate.google.com/translat...ge%3D1&act=url

Wow! look at that. Nice pics Sutts, it looks like the dry desert has preserved it quite well.

Flanker35M 04-19-2012 08:32 AM

S!

Interesting find and seems not to be too much robbed by looters. Would be nice to know more about this plane, how it ended up there etc. Thanks for sharing.

DroopSnoot 04-19-2012 09:18 AM

I have a soft spot for tomahawks and kittyhawks.

It appears this looks like a tomahawk, you can tell this by the air intake on the nose. By the development of the C variant the intake had been streamlined and lowered, also the nose mounted machine guns had been removed.

Tomahawk's were P40C & D's. Kittyhawk's were P40E,F & G's, Warhawks were K's upwards.

Sutts 04-19-2012 09:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DroopSnoot (Post 411107)
I have a soft spot for Warhawks and kittyhawks ofc :)

Warhawk's were P40C & D Tomahawk II's. Kittyhawk's were P40E,F & G's.

What do you reckon this one is DroopSnoot?

DroopSnoot 04-19-2012 09:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sutts (Post 411108)
What do you reckon this one is DroopSnoot?


Sorry sutts I made a typo ive updated my post above.


This is a tomahawk I'm betting, looks like an early one at first glance as the iconic Radiator intake is smaller. Although by the E the air intake was more streamlined the oil radiator was much larger to cope with the larger uprated engine.

Another indication is the spinner size and frontal nose area, with the Kitty is much bigger and boxy than the tomahawk:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._kittyhawk.jpg

In comparison:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...6_tomahawk.jpg

(Not ideal photo I know)

Sutts 04-19-2012 09:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DroopSnoot (Post 411113)

Sorry sutts I made a typo ive updated my post above.


This is a tomahawk I'm betting, looks like an early one at first glance as the iconic Radiator intake is smaller. Although by the E the air intake was more streamlined the oil radiator was much larger to cope with the larger uprated engine.

Another indication is the spinner size and frontal nose area, with the Kitty is much bigger and boxy than the tomahawk:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._kittyhawk.jpg

In comparison:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...6_tomahawk.jpg

(Not ideal photo I know)


Thanks DroopSnoot. I can't stop looking at these pics, just love timecapsules. Hope it gets the treatment it deserves. Wonder if the pilot got home?

DroopSnoot 04-19-2012 09:55 AM

Sad thought but many pilots didnt because of the vastness of the desert. I could be wrong but i dont think the RAF had a search & resuce for the desert because of the fluid nature of the war there.

I remember watching a war film years ago with P40's, it had a Tomahawk and a Kittyhawk in it. I'm gonna go hunt for it watch this space.

Geronimo989 04-19-2012 10:05 AM

Wonder if it is restorable?

DroopSnoot 04-19-2012 10:05 AM

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0069953/

Never released to DVD but my father did video it, maybe i ask him to see if he still has it and convert it.

DroopSnoot 04-19-2012 10:11 AM

FOUND IT !!!

It was under its American Title, awful quality though.
ENJOY :grin:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sstU7qvLw7Q

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFB8D...feature=relmfu

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E817k...feature=relmfu

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KowZk...feature=relmfu

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qy5ju...feature=relmfu

Sternjaeger II 04-19-2012 10:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Geronimo989 (Post 411130)
Wonder if it is restorable?

oh yes, everything is restorable, and that one is in remarkable conditions as well! In fact I wouldn't restore it, we already have flyable P-40s, considering how complete it is it would be nice to put it in a museum as it is, since a restoration would get rid of the original paintjob and panels.

ElAurens 04-19-2012 11:30 AM

That is definitely a Hawk 87 RAF name Kittyhawk, not the early Hawk 81, known to the RAF as a Tomahawk.

An amazing find.

I hope they are able to secure it.

BP_Tailspin 04-19-2012 11:48 AM

Incredible Find.

http://www.cubpilot.com/Tspin/Sahara1.jpg

http://www.cubpilot.com/Tspin/Sahara2.jpg

http://www.cubpilot.com/Tspin/Sahara3.jpg

http://www.cubpilot.com/Tspin/Sahara4.jpg

http://www.cubpilot.com/Tspin/Sahara5.jpg

pupaxx 04-19-2012 11:54 AM

:shock::shock::shock:

Trumper 04-19-2012 12:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Geronimo989 (Post 411130)
Wonder if it is restorable?

Yes,they've restored Spitfires with a little more than a data plate,have that and money and it could be flying in a few years.

PeterPanPan 04-19-2012 12:30 PM

Amazing! Thanks for sharing. I wonder what happened to the pilot? Great forced landing.

I also wonder just how many other well preserved wrecks there are in the world's deserts.

PPP

BH_woodstock 04-19-2012 12:42 PM

wow, that is fantastic! p40 is my favorite plane of all time and someday i will enjoy flying it in Dover.great find!maybe russian p40 in my future?soon?

Sven 04-19-2012 01:49 PM

That's awesome!

Are those bullet holes? I'm putting my money on a BF109 as the killer :twisted:

Chromius 04-19-2012 03:14 PM

Cool info, thanks for the post. Amazing no on has come across it and stripped it. Goes to show what a wasteland the desert is. As was said looks well preserved, hopefully someone who can do something with it saves and restores it.

On a side note. I still regret not attempting to buy a rusted out Original 1968 Mustang GT500 I came across in 1990 or so, it had been sitting outside since the son had left for Vietnam and died there. It was in the middle of no where as I had gotten lost getting off a highway off ramp looking for fuel for my 67 Mustang 390BB Fastback. I found a gas station and asked about it and the guy told me about the son and Vietnam and said I should offer her some money for it and get rid of it so it would not be a constant reminder to her. But I did not. Hindsight. (They sell for 50-100k now and even a frame with a serial number is worth 8k or so.)

I also came across what I believe is a complete WWII fighter engine in a small shop corner in NZ when I was living there and it was in excellent condition , I wrote all the numbers down from it and meant to pursue it further but have no idea where I wrote the info.

JG5_emil 04-19-2012 03:22 PM

Reminds me of places I've worked in Algeria

Igo kyu 04-19-2012 04:01 PM

Looks as if there's a radial cowling behind it.

Are we really sure it's not a hawk 75/P36?

swiss 04-19-2012 04:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by addman (Post 411093)
Wow! look at that. Nice pics Sutts, it looks like the dry desert has preserved it quite well.

True, and saved money as well - you can skip the sandblasting. ;)

ElAurens 04-19-2012 04:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Igo kyu (Post 411403)
Looks as if there's a radial cowling behind it.

Are we really sure it's not a hawk 75/P36?

I know my Curtiss Hawks. Note the exhaust stacks on the side of the engine cowling and the scoop on top.

That is a Hawk 87.

What you are seeing in the background is the Prop, Spinner and reduction gear box that broke off in the crash.

addman 04-19-2012 04:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by swiss (Post 411448)
True, and saved money as well - you can skip the sandblasting. ;)

No kidding! Those surfaces have been sandblasted by mother nature herself, bet you can almost see your own reflection on that or put a fresh coat of mottling on it.:)

Igo kyu 04-19-2012 05:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ElAurens (Post 411457)
I know my Curtiss Hawks. Note the exhaust stacks on the side of the engine cowling and the scoop on top.

Okay, yes, I see the gap where the exhasts should be, good point.

Quote:

That is a Hawk 87.
If you say so. No offence intended, I was curious.

ElAurens 04-19-2012 09:37 PM

:cool:

Didn't take any offence sir.

major_setback 04-19-2012 09:45 PM

Poor pilot. I can't help wonder if he survived, and for how long.

It's in good condition, considering the time that has passed. Barely a scratch really. Looks like one of my better landings :-).

Thee_oddball 04-19-2012 10:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by major_setback (Post 411639)
Poor pilot. I can't help wonder if he survived, and for how long.

It's in good condition, considering the time that has passed. Barely a scratch really. Looks like one of my better landings :-).

i was wondering the same thing, if they identify the plane I would be curios if the pilot survived and is he still alive, if he is it would be nice to see him reunited with it :)


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