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IL-2 Sturmovik The famous combat flight simulator.

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  #1  
Old 06-23-2013, 04:22 AM
RPS69 RPS69 is offline
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Default La 5f and carburators.

A question, I recently learned that one big difference between La 5F and FN, is that the first got a carburator, and the later an injection system.

Anyone knows how the soviets managed with the negative High G's with their carburators?
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Old 06-23-2013, 05:50 AM
JtD JtD is offline
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Not sure about Russian carburettor technology, but injections carburettors is what the US and later the British used.
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Old 06-23-2013, 06:23 PM
SaQSoN SaQSoN is offline
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There were float-less carburetors for aircraft engines, which did not experience negative G problems. This were put in production in USSR in 1940. I am not sure, though, which type was used on M-82F.
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Old 06-23-2013, 10:58 PM
RPS69 RPS69 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SaQSoN View Post
There were float-less carburetors for aircraft engines, which did not experience negative G problems. This were put in production in USSR in 1940. I am not sure, though, which type was used on M-82F.
I did a fast search on the thing, and it appears that the floatless carburetors were available on german engines since WWI. But they entered russia in the hands of an italian airships builder, Nobile. After Hitler's arrival, and the german military industry withdraw from russia, the soviets managed to develope a native version from the old german one.

Maybe on the M82, the history is different, but is surprising that something so old was not taken by the allies at the end of WWI.
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Old 06-23-2013, 11:40 PM
horseback horseback is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPS69 View Post
I did a fast search on the thing, and it appears that the floatless carburetors were available on german engines since WWI. But they entered russia in the hands of an italian airships builder, Nobile. After Hitler's arrival, and the german military industry withdraw from russia, the soviets managed to develope a native version from the old german one.

Maybe on the M82, the history is different, but is surprising that something so old was not taken by the allies at the end of WWI.
I don't think that the Allies actually occupied Germany itself or 'looted' German technology after WWI the way they did after WWII. Part of the reason may have been that the relatively elderly diplomats negotiating the ceasefire were simply not that conscious of how important such things might become--they just said "give us all your Fokker D.VIIs" and figured that would end German air superiority forever.

cheers

horseback
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