1C Home   |   Register   |   Today Posts   |   Members   |   UserCP   |   Calendar   |   Search   |   FAQ

Go Back   Official 1C Company forum > 1C Publishing > IL-2 Sturmovik: Cliffs of Dover > Technical threads > Vehicle and Terrain threads

Vehicle and Terrain threads Discussions about environment and vehicles in CoD

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-30-2013, 02:43 AM
ZeroXitreo ZeroXitreo is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1
Default Aircraft soft-body physics

Hi, I have an idea that should be considered in adding for the next update of Cliffs of Dover. This idea is for soft-body physics. If there were soft-body physics in the game, it would be so much more realistic with bullet damage, and crash landings. For instance, if you had to crash land in the middle of nowhere if your engine(s) were blown out, and you had nowhere to go. If you hit your wing a bit hard on the ground, it should bend up a bit. Or, if your taking fire, and bullets constantly hit you, metal from your aircraft should fly away in pieces of deadly shrapnel that could injure your foes aircraft if it hits it.

Hopefully this idea will get support, and be considered for the next update for IL-2 Sturmovik: Cliffs of Dover.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-30-2013, 08:31 AM
stndbfrgrn stndbfrgrn is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Italy
Posts: 42
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeroXitreo View Post
considered for the next update for IL-2 Sturmovik: Cliffs of Dover.
So sorry.

Still, taking your example of metal fragments hitting and damaging the pursuing aircraft or anyone in the vicinity, I think that would require a level of complexity in physics simulation quite higher than what is generally used for "games". Managing the behaviour of a departing aileron is another thing...

I don't know if it has been disclosed yet but since Rise of Flight uses an interesting damage model in which airframes bend and deform based on impact convincingly enough, this may hopefully be applied to BOS as well. Although I am ignorant and have no idea of how much it would take to bend a metal wing without snapping it away first.

Last edited by stndbfrgrn; 01-30-2013 at 08:38 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-30-2013, 02:07 PM
Stublerone Stublerone is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 250
Default

We must be fair and tell you that there will be no update on clod anymore. Project closed, game development closed and no new scenario.

I am afraid you have to live with cliffs of dover as it is, if no wonder happens somehow.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-08-2013, 07:17 AM
MOG_Hammer MOG_Hammer is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 16
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by stndbfrgrn View Post
So sorry.

Still, taking your example of metal fragments hitting and damaging the pursuing aircraft or anyone in the vicinity, I think that would require a level of complexity in physics simulation quite higher than what is generally used for "games". Managing the behaviour of a departing aileron is another thing...

I don't know if it has been disclosed yet but since Rise of Flight uses an interesting damage model in which airframes bend and deform based on impact convincingly enough, this may hopefully be applied to BOS as well. Although I am ignorant and have no idea of how much it would take to bend a metal wing without snapping it away first.
Nowaday games uses a lot a soft physics (actually called cloth physics) to represent déformations in clothes and soft metal. I believe Havok engine can do that. nVidia Physx is surelly the better choice, since it is done on hardware, but requires to have an nVidia card with that specific capability (all nVidia cards since the 8800 GTS). Those with ATI would be out of luck.

So it is not just a simple matter of having physics in game, the main reason is that not all video cards can run physx, and not all CPUs are good for Havok. Developers must make some painfull decisions when building a game, and surelly physics is often the first to be shown the door.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-08-2013, 07:23 AM
GF_Mastiff's Avatar
GF_Mastiff GF_Mastiff is offline
71st_Mastiff
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: EL Centro
Posts: 884
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MOG_Hammer View Post
Nowaday games uses a lot a soft physics (actually called cloth physics) to represent déformations in clothes and soft metal. I believe Havok engine can do that. nVidia Physx is surelly the better choice, since it is done on hardware, but requires to have an nVidia card with that specific capability (all nVidia cards since the 8800 GTS). Those with ATI would be out of luck.

So it is not just a simple matter of having physics in game, the main reason is that not all video cards can run physx, and not all CPUs are good for Havok. Developers must make some painfull decisions when building a game, and surelly physics is often the first to be shown the door.
that's not entirely true, physic X can work with ATI, Physic X can run on the CPU.
just look for an old archived copy of ageia. http://ageia-physx.software.informer.com/
__________________
71st Eagle Squadron
www.anon6.com - Blogger on DCS Series
71st Mastiff's You-Tube
" any failure you meet is never a defeat; merely a set up for a greater come back "
Asus||i7x5930k||16gb3200||GTX10808gb||ATX1200Corsa ir||CBTitanium7.1||Win10x64||TrackIr4Pro/ir||gladiator pro mkII||siatekpedals||X52Throttle||G15Keyboard/RazerMouse||
32"LCD||2x7" lilliputs,1x9inc
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:59 PM.

Based on a design by: Miner Skinz.com

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2007 1C Company. All rights reserved.