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IL-2 Sturmovik The famous combat flight simulator.

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  #11  
Old 09-19-2010, 11:11 AM
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Barnowl Barnowl is offline
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there are 2,946 pilots credited with flying in the Battle of Britain, of these 574 were not British. That is 19.5%. Poland had the most at 145, New Zealand next with 135 followed by Canada with 112.
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  #12  
Old 09-19-2010, 01:02 PM
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Rodolphe Rodolphe is offline
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...

The nationalities of Fighter Command

A substantial contingent of more than 500 pilots from countries other the United Kingdom flew with their British counterparts in the Battle of Britain.
The international mix of participants - defined by their flying at least one authorized operational sortie with an eligible unit between 10 July and 31 October 1940 - is as follows.
  • Great Britain 2353
  • Poland 139
  • New Zealand 98
  • Canada 86
  • Czechoslovakia 84
  • Belgium 29
  • Australia 21
  • South Africa 20
  • France 13
  • Ireland 10
  • United States 7
  • Jamaica 2
  • Egypt 1
  • Austria 1
  • Iceland 1
  • Palestine Mandate 1
  • Southern Rhodesia 1
  • Unknown 4


...
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  #13  
Old 09-19-2010, 04:27 PM
ATAG_Dutch ATAG_Dutch is offline
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Quote:
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The nationalities of Fighter Command[*]Unknown 4[/LIST]

...
I was unaware of any Argentinian involvement, could these be the unknown 4?
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  #14  
Old 09-20-2010, 11:32 AM
WTE_Galway WTE_Galway is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnowl View Post
there are 2,946 pilots credited with flying in the Battle of Britain, of these 574 were not British. That is 19.5%. Poland had the most at 145, New Zealand next with 135 followed by Canada with 112.
Its not just the pilots that were non British.

Remember that Air Vice Marshal Keith Park was from the Colonies ... a New Zealander.
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  #15  
Old 09-20-2010, 03:01 PM
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zakkandrachoff zakkandrachoff is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rodolphe View Post
...

The nationalities of Fighter Command

A substantial contingent of more than 500 pilots from countries other the United Kingdom flew with their British counterparts in the Battle of Britain.
The international mix of participants - defined by their flying at least one authorized operational sortie with an eligible unit between 10 July and 31 October 1940 - is as follows.
  • Great Britain 2353
  • Poland 139
  • New Zealand 98
  • Canada 86
  • Czechoslovakia 84
  • Belgium 29
  • Australia 21
  • South Africa 20
  • France 13
  • Ireland 10
  • United States 7
  • Jamaica 2
  • Egypt 1
  • Austria 1
  • Iceland 1
  • Palestine Mandate 1
  • Southern Rhodesia 1
  • Unknown 4


...
mmm, don't you miss some argentine pilots?
i am not a supernationalist but only put some data. I dont know the numbers of Arg pilots

Some of the pilots were native Argentines, while the surnames of others reveal they were descended from British professionals who had helped develop the country's railways, mines and farms.

Ricardo Moreno, 89, said: "The Argentines had the advantage that they were very sports-minded. They were good. They did very well in Britain because they were used to roughing it."


164 Strike.The Argentine Flying Officer Ronald Sheward (RAFVR) flying his Hurricane IV FJ-B (KX540) of the 164 Argentine Squadron of the RAF, strike over the Hansweert Channel (The Netherlands) on September 2, 1942.
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  #16  
Old 09-21-2010, 01:28 AM
airmalik airmalik is offline
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I found out only recently that there were a few Indian pilots in the RAF as well.

http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/IAF/Hi...PilotsRAF.html

Few people realise that a number of Indian pilots took part in operations from England. At the height of the Battle of Britain, 24 Indian pilots were sent to the UK to under go conversion training and participate in Ops. Even though they could take part only after the Battle of Britain, many of them distinguished themselves flying operations with the various commands.

Battle of Britain's last surviving Indian Pilot:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/kent/hi/...00/8872500.stm
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  #17  
Old 09-21-2010, 06:23 PM
KnightFandragon KnightFandragon is offline
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Dang, I usually laugh at the 303 squadron when I see it in the line up in IL2, after seeing that vid there, they are some bad asses =D Nice
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  #18  
Old 09-22-2010, 12:10 AM
EvilMonkee EvilMonkee is offline
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You have to be careful over what is defined as the Battle. Yes, there were Argentine Sqn in the RAF (their Sqn number escapes me) but they did not take part in the BoB and fought from around 1942 onwards.
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  #19  
Old 09-23-2010, 07:16 AM
Flanker35M Flanker35M is offline
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S!

Interesting video. Could have gone a bit deeper into things, but even as it is now gave nicely information propably not known to many. Saddest thing was to see how Poland was shafted so many times, by both Allies and enemy. First was the promise from England that they will help if Germany invades. Well, Russia did too and England could not do a thing.

Next thing you know is that both KZ-Adolf and Gulag-Josif are molesting Poland to their hearts content and many pilots get thru Europe to fly with RAF so they can help their homeland after war. So far so good. At Yalta conference Allies agree that Europe should be liberated but left to grow in democracy, that no troops should be left there permanently. Gulag-Josif nods his head with fingers crossed behind his back and shafts Poland again 1944 at Warszaw uprising, when promising to help Polish against Germans. Well, they watched the show across the river and then "liberated" Poland and put it under a communist puppet regime without an intention to leave Poland or rest of the "liberated" East-Europe at end of WW2.

End of WW2..where can the Polish pilots go? Brits do not want/need them anymore or acknowledge them so they won't upset Gulag-Josif. At their homeland they have no future and many end up dead if returning or as outsiders or have to flee abroad. So truly what the Polish pilot said: We have lost the war. Extremely sarcastic writing but based on historical facts.
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  #20  
Old 09-23-2010, 01:49 PM
Splitter Splitter is offline
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True post!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flanker35M View Post
S!

Interesting video. Could have gone a bit deeper into things, but even as it is now gave nicely information propably not known to many. Saddest thing was to see how Poland was shafted so many times, by both Allies and enemy. First was the promise from England that they will help if Germany invades. Well, Russia did too and England could not do a thing.

Next thing you know is that both KZ-Adolf and Gulag-Josif are molesting Poland to their hearts content and many pilots get thru Europe to fly with RAF so they can help their homeland after war. So far so good. At Yalta conference Allies agree that Europe should be liberated but left to grow in democracy, that no troops should be left there permanently. Gulag-Josif nods his head with fingers crossed behind his back and shafts Poland again 1944 at Warszaw uprising, when promising to help Polish against Germans. Well, they watched the show across the river and then "liberated" Poland and put it under a communist puppet regime without an intention to leave Poland or rest of the "liberated" East-Europe at end of WW2.

End of WW2..where can the Polish pilots go? Brits do not want/need them anymore or acknowledge them so they won't upset Gulag-Josif. At their homeland they have no future and many end up dead if returning or as outsiders or have to flee abroad. So truly what the Polish pilot said: We have lost the war. Extremely sarcastic writing but based on historical facts.
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