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IL-2 Sturmovik The famous combat flight simulator.

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  #1  
Old 10-08-2012, 09:11 PM
Freelansir Freelansir is offline
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Default "Realistic Navigation" - yellow light

Recently I wanted to learn more about "realistic navigation" and so I flew the B-25 blind landing practice provided in Single Missions.

Everything went smooth but I got a yellow light enroute to the target field. It looks like some kind of marker beacon. However it only blinked on briefly once. I understand the concept of Outer/Middle/Inner beacon markers.



I searched the internet but all I could find is this gauge, but without a light associated with it.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AN/MRN-1

So my question is, what in the world is the yellow light for ?

Thanks
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  #2  
Old 10-08-2012, 10:13 PM
Buster_Dee Buster_Dee is offline
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I'm not in the know, but the marker beacons are part of the process. If I recall:

1st time, light says start the standard decent now.

2nd time, light says you're about to cross touchdown, so chop your power.

If nothing to do with those, I'll be no help. Sorry.

Last edited by Buster_Dee; 10-08-2012 at 10:32 PM.
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  #3  
Old 10-09-2012, 12:50 AM
Pfeil Pfeil is offline
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It's likely the beacons from Lorenz are included with the AN/MRN-1 to allow non-US aircraft to use the hayrake transmitter.

The relevant information is given in the wikipedia article:

Quote:
Two small radio beacons were also used with Lorenz, one 300 m off the end of runway, the HEZ, and another 3 km away, the VEZ, also broadcast on 38 MHz and modulated at 1700 and 700 Hz, respectively. These signals were broadcast directly upward, and would be heard briefly as the aircraft flew over them. To approach the runway, the aircraft would fly to a published altitude and then use the main directional signals to line up with the runway and started flying toward it. When they flew over the VEZ they would start descending on a standard glide slope, continuing to land or abort at the HEZ depending on whether or not they could see the runway.

In order to ease the workload, Lorenz later introduced a cockpit indicator that could listen to the signals and display the direction to the runway centerline as an arrow telling the pilot which direction to turn. The indicator also included neon lamp to indicate when the aircraft crossed over the marker beacons.
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Old 10-09-2012, 01:28 AM
Freelansir Freelansir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pfeil View Post
It's likely the beacons from Lorenz are included with the AN/MRN-1 to allow non-US aircraft to use the hayrake transmitter.

The relevant information is given in the wikipedia article:
Thank you for your reply but the Lorenz system was used by the Luftwaffe: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorenz_beam

I'm talking about the USAAF B-25 which is using the AAF Instrument Approach System: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AN/MRN-1



But my question still remains the same: what is that yellow light for.

I only ask that the designers here of "realistic navigation" for what purpose did they include that light.

As for ILS marker beacons see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marker_beacon

Last edited by Freelansir; 10-09-2012 at 01:31 AM.
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  #5  
Old 10-09-2012, 03:26 AM
JV44Priller JV44Priller is offline
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I tried to build a mission that used that system once and now I see where I messed up.
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  #6  
Old 10-09-2012, 05:36 AM
K_Freddie K_Freddie is offline
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ILS - instrument landing system

As you probably know.. The lights, usually 3, each a different colour, are activated by vertical radio beams placed in the landing path at certain intervals. I don't think the distances were standardised at that time, but they just gave the pilot an indication of how far he was from the runway. As the beams are vertical you pass through them very quickly causing the lights to flash briefly. If you keep the needles in the middle (on the dot) you should 'hit' the runway a couple of meters in.

As you hit the last beacon, you should seriously consider flaring and hold it there until your wheels hit something
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Last edited by K_Freddie; 10-09-2012 at 05:43 AM.
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  #7  
Old 10-09-2012, 05:29 PM
Freelansir Freelansir is offline
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Gents,

We are getting off-topic here from the question.

This thread is not about ILS systems nor tutorials on landing as I am familiar with them in FS2004.



It is about a gauge that is in the B-25 in IL2 and what the yellow lamp means.



I have searched the internet for pictures of B-25 cockpits and have found none that show this gauge nor this lamp.

Ergo, my question.

I appreciate your interest though.
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  #8  
Old 10-09-2012, 08:28 PM
jameson jameson is offline
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News

Nature 142, 1111-1111 (24 December 193 | doi:10.1038/1421111c0

Blind Landing System for Royal Air Force Equipment

Top of page
Abstract

THE Air Ministry has announced its intention to equip all R.A.F. bombers and reconnaissance aircraft with the Lorenz blind approach system. If experiments during this winter prove this to be successful, the fighter class of aircraft will then also be so equipped. This follows the announcement that forty R.A.F. aerodromes would have the radio transmitting apparatus for this system installed, as mentioned in NATURE of November 26. The apparatus to be carried in each machine weighs 50 lb. and costs about £200. Its manipulation demands a certain technique, and pilots need, considerable practice before being able to use it in addition to the other movements and observations that are incidental to the operation of landing a modern high-speed aeroplane. A special ‘Link’ trainer is used for practice in the use of the Lorenz system, upon which approaches and landings can be simulated without leaving the ground. These are to be provided at R.A.F. flying schools, in addition to which each service station will carry one. The training of the personnel will be undertaken by special instructors, who will have already attended courses at the Central Flying School at Upavon, Wilts.
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  #9  
Old 10-09-2012, 11:25 PM
Pfeil Pfeil is offline
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What I'm trying to explain is that the function of that light is the same as it is for the Lorenz system, I.E. it illuminates while you're passing over a beacon and then extinguishes.

I'm not claiming the AN/MRN-1 functioned like this in real life, merely that it is possible Team Daidalos implemented it in this manner.
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Old 10-10-2012, 06:46 AM
K_Freddie K_Freddie is offline
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I think that everyone is on topic.. you failed to identify the possibility that the ILS systems then, might have only had one indicator. This was when it seemed to be working the same way as today's 3 beacon indicators
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